Reclaiming Public Space

Reclaiming Public Space

Reclaiming Public Spaces is an initiative of the Nashville Civic Design Center aimed at improving the built environment for use by all people. This program is multifaceted in nature, including physical improvements to the public realm, the publication of materials like case studies and best practices, and the education of the Nashville community on how to create and sustain great public spaces. Over the course of two years, the NCDC hopes to elevate the conversation currently taking place in Nashville around public spaces, and to create real change within these spaces for the benefit of all Nashvillians.

         

“The best public spaces foster community, elevate quality of life, and connect us to our city, and, more importantly, to each other. Quality open space - whether a park, plaza, public building, or even a modest street bench - are the spaces that enable us to absorb our surroundings, to relax, eat lunch, meet a friend, experience nature, people-watch, find quiet in the cacophony, or even exercise. This is where our cities come alive and demonstrate their vitality, energy, culture, and local pride.

We all know what the word “public” means — open, free, accessible to all. But the best part of the definition is this: of and belonging to the people. Public space is for everyone, it belongs to each and every one of us, both literally and figuratively.

In the purest sense, quality public space instills in all of us a sense of belonging — that we belong to a larger community and in turn, that our city belongs to us. When the public realm is vibrant, beautiful, and active, it is a demonstration that the local government values its citizens and their quality of life. Alternatively, when the public realm is neglected, badly designed, or treated as an afterthought, it reflects poorly on the city, effectively sending a message that the government does not value its citizens or its visitors. Well-designed, beautiful public spaces have the power to restore a sense of dignity to our urban environment, enrich our civic life and foster a sense of ownership in local residents.

Each day, every one of us moves through public space, whether driving down the street, walking down the sidewalk, or sitting in a park.. When we as citizens take ownership of our public spaces and invest, we reap the benefits of a healthy, vibrant, energetic community. The challenge is how we articulate this value – to our neighbor, to our elected official, to our children. Cities are complex places, with diverse stakeholders who often have competing interests and goals. In order to tackle big problems, we must be optimistic. We must recognize the power of good design to positively impact our lives and our cities.”

(Excerpt from Reclaiming Public Space in Downtown Nashville, NCDC, March 2013)

 

Recent Projects

Fairgrounds Public Meetings Report

Fairgrounds Public Meetings Report

The Nashville Civic Design Center was asked by Mayor David Briley and the Fairgrounds Nashville Board of Directors, to facilitate a series of public meetings with the Fairgrounds Design Team, to get input in order to inform a more refined version of the Fairground Improvement Plan.

Franklin Pike Multi-modal Path

Franklin Pike Multi-modal Path

Oak Hill is a satellite city of Nashville, TN located less then 4 miles south of downtown Nashville along Interstate 65 between Nashville and Franklin. The main spine of Oak Hill is Franklin Pike which connects it to Brentwood and Berry Hill. The location is conveniently accessible allowing for several commuting options along I-65, Franklin Pike, etc. Oak Hill is also the gateway to Radnor Wildlife Refuge area, a major asset to the entire region attracting over 1.45 million visitors in 2017.Oak Hill Mayor, Heidi Campbell, approached the Nashville Civic Design Center with the idea of creating a multi-modal path along Franklin Pike to better connect Oak Hill with the Walk N Bike Master Plan, the future and existing greenway network by taking advantage of the right-of-way along Franklin Pike.Oak Hill is a satellite city of Nashville, TN located less then 4 miles south of downtown Nashville along Interstate 65 between Nashville and Franklin. The main spine of Oak Hill is Franklin Pike which connects it to Brentwood and Berry Hill.

The location is conveniently accessible allowing for several commuting options along I-65, Franklin Pike, etc. Oak Hill is also the gateway to Radnor Wildlife Refuge area, a major asset to the entire region attracting over 1.45 million visitors in 2017.

Oak Hill Mayor, Heidi Campbell, approached the Nashville Civic Design Center with the idea of creating a multi-modal path along Franklin Pike to better connect Oak Hill with the Walk N Bike Master Plan, the future and existing greenway network by taking advantage of the right-of-way along Franklin Pike. This connection could bridge the gap between Oak Hill residents, Radnor Lake State Park, Oak Hill is a satellite city of Nashville, TN located less then 4 miles south of downtown Nashville along Interstate 65 between Nashville and Franklin. The main spine of Oak Hill is Franklin Pike which connects it to Brentwood and Berry Hill. The location is conveniently accessible allowing for several commuting options along I-65, Franklin Pike, etc. Oak Hill is also the gateway to Radnor Wildlife Refuge area, a major asset to the entire region attracting over 1.45 million visitors in 2017.Oak Hill Mayor, Heidi Campbell, approached the Nashville Civic Design Center with the idea of creating a multi-modal path along Franklin Pike to better connect Oak Hill with the Walk N Bike Master Plan, the future and existing greenway network by taking advantage of the right-of-way along Franklin Pike.

Connecting The Dots

Connecting The Dots

In Nashville Civic Design Center's "The Nashville Plan: Shaping the Healthy Community" seven transects are identified that make up Davidson County. Each of these zones have their strengths and challenges as they strive to form a healthy, safe community. This publication of the Nashville Civic Design Center (NCDC) is aimed to make us rethink how public spaces in Davidson County can be reactivated across various scales. The report looks at five individual sites within their respective “transect zone." They are: Natural and Rural, Suburban, Center, Urban, and Downtown.

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