Publications

Envision Nolensville Pike: Community, Creativity and Imagination in Placemaking Preview

Envision Nolensville Pike: Community, Creativity and Imagination in Placemaking

Led by Conexión Américas and funded by the Kresge Foundation, ENVISION NOLENSVILLE PIKE maps out --literally and figuratively-- the aspirations and dreams for the Nolensville Pike corridor as expressed by residents and business owners during community gatherings. A public/private partnership with the Nashville Area MPO, Transportation for America and the Nashville Civic Design Center.

Creating a Walkable Green Hills Preview

Creating a Walkable Green Hills

Green Hills is a shopping destination center that was designed around the automobile. The construction of the Mall has spurred commercial development along Hillsboro Pike, in a suburban, strip-mall format with surface parking fronting the corridor. This type of development is not conducive to walking or biking, but instead increases road congestion and discourages a healthy lifestyle. This publication is a result of the work done in partnership with TURBO Nashville and the Alliance for Green Hills.

Reclaiming Public Space: Accessing our Streets Preview

Reclaiming Public Space: Accessing our Streets

The goal of evaluating public access to roads in Nashville is to create an awareness of various road restrictions caused by situations such as construction and special events and how such occurrences affect the public. The proposals presented are intended to inform, improve, and reclaim various spaces to improve the convenience and safety of walking, cycling, and using public transit in a shared road space.

Nashville's Boathouse: Connecting Community to the Cumberland Preview

Nashville's Boathouse: Connecting Community to the Cumberland

The vision for Nashville’s Riverfront is one that is aimed towards defining and enhancing the unique cultural identity of Music City, USA. As a thriving commercial and industrial district, Nashville’s focus on providing a vibrant waterfront experience for all has recently been bolstered by newly-constructed or renovated landmarks.

Access and Livability: Transit Oriented Development, Nashville’s Northwest Link Preview

Access and Livability: Transit Oriented Development, Nashville’s Northwest Link

This book explores case studies of successful transit-oriented developments from around the United States and offers recommendations for a route along Middle Tennessee’s northwest corridor, a critical route from Nashville to Clarksville. This corridor was originally identified in the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) 2035 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) as a key connection in Middle Tennessee’s mass transit vision. This recommendation was supported by the MPO’s 2008 feasibility study which produced potential alignments for commuter rail, route improvements, capital costs and preliminary operations budget for the corridor between Clarksville and Nashville. Expanding upon that work, in early 2015 the MPO and the Regional Transit Authority (RTA) launched a Northwest Corridor Study to examine cost effective transit improvements in the northwest corridor to connect travelers to destinations (work, school, shopping, entertainment, etc.) and address anticipated traffic congestion.

Access and Livability: Neighborhood Infill Strategies, Developing Davidson County Preview

Access and Livability: Neighborhood Infill Strategies, Developing Davidson County

Metro Nashville is projected to add 200,000 new residents and approximately 300,000 new jobs over the next 25 years. In order to accommodate this influx of growth, Metro must be responsive and proactive in how we design our city and county. While we expect a fair amount of re-development in the urban core as well as greenfield development in the region’s outer reaches, it’s the places in-between that have the most potential. Nashville Next, the general plan for Nashville’s future, calls for city’s pikes and the centers located at their crossroads, to be the areas that will accommodate new residents and workers as we grow. Therefore retrofitting these suburban areas and re- imagining them as mixed-use, vibrant places is imperative to the success of Nashville’s future. These suburban locales offer both a tremendous challenge and a great opportunity for redevelopment in the coming decades.

Seeding Spaces Preview

Seeding Spaces

Seeding Spaces is a publication examining the state of urban agriculture in Nashville

Micro Unit Housing Preview

Micro Unit Housing

Urban Design Vertical Studio was a course  that addressed urban design projects responding to specific Greater Nashville conditions, with exploration of urban issues in understanding and making the city’s architecture. Student investigations analyze cultural, physical and environmental influences on architectural form, space and structure. A second session, Directed Research, was were each student worked on a specific topic or project related to that faculty member’s area of expertise, research, scholarship, or creative activity.

Reclaiming Public Space In Downtown Nashville Preview

Reclaiming Public Space In Downtown Nashville

The United States is challenged with the highest obesity rates in the world, a sobering fact potentially attributed to an environment lacking effective public open space. We have seemingly shaped an environment where childhood obesity has quadrupled, and 42 percent of Americans are projected to be obese by 2030.

In response to the fact that one in four Nashvillians are obese, our city’s planning practices have shifted towards creating healthier built environments.

Urban Infill Concepts: Along Nashville's East-West Connector Corridor Preview

Urban Infill Concepts: Along Nashville's East-West Connector Corridor

Urban infill development allows cities to reclaim vacant or underutilized land by encouraging a greater mixture of residential, retail, and employment opportunities, this usually includes the integration of health-conscience land uses; such as open space for productive urban gardens, commercial horticulture, and even neighborhood playgrounds. Urban infill is crucial for providing space for transit infrastructure as well as development close to transit stations in the form of transit-oriented development (TOD) areas.

Reclaiming Public Space Preview

Reclaiming Public Space

 Reclaiming Public Space is a project of the Nashville Civic Design Center in partnership with the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization (MPO). This study was made possible by a grant from the Tennessee Department of Transportation (TDOT) and the Federal Highway Administration.

Healing the Pikes Preview

Healing the Pikes

an important challenge of The Plan of Nashville is to recapture Nashville’s historic pikes-turned-arterials as the means to link and enhance all elements of the city. to reestablish our traditional pikes as great corridors we must do nothing more–or less– than apply the lessons of urban avenues and boulevards.

Together Making Nashville Green Preview

Together Making Nashville Green

This report presents a set of 16 goals and 71 recommendations ranging from energy conservation to transportation to public participation. The attainment of our ambitious vision for Nashville’s future will require focused implementation on the part of both public and private sec-tors of our city.

Capitol Boulevard Revisited Preview

Capitol Boulevard Revisited

Since the opening of the downtown Library, there has been renewed interest in the role that Capitol Boulevard, the street directly in front of the Library, plays in the life of the city. The Nashville Civic Design Center, the Library’s neighbor at 7th and Church, has been study ing public space downtown over the past year and placed Capitol Bou le vard at the top of its research agenda be cause of its prominence and potential. The drawings presented here are three, of possibly many, concepts for what Capitol Boulevard can become as we con tin u ous ly try to improve the quality of downtown Nashville.

Rolling Mill Hill & The Rutledge Hill Neighborhood Findings And Recommendations Preview

Rolling Mill Hill & The Rutledge Hill Neighborhood Findings And Recommendations

This document was produced to help guide development of the Metro-owned properties known as Rolling Mill Hill. These holdings include the site of the former Metropolitan Hospital and the area of the historic trolley car barns. The work was produced by the Nashville Civic Design Center in concert with the greater Nashville community. The design staff and interns of the Civic Design Center during the study were: Mark M. Schimmenti, Design Director; John Houghton, Design Assistant; and the design interns Blythe Bailey, Ted Booth, Abbie Lee Majors, and Catherine Tracy. The historical research was conducted by Astrid Schoonhoven. The geological study was by John Houghton. Judy Steele of the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency, Randall Hutcheson of the Metro Planning Department, and Jeff Campbell of Metro Public Works contributed significantly to the report.