The Plan of Nashville

The Plan of Nashville

The Plan of Nashville was a 2 1/2 year project to develop a community-based vision and design principles for metropolitan Nashville's urban core, the area within the inner interstate highway loop and the neighborhoods adjacent to it. Since 1950, more than 100 individual plans have been proposed for various parts of Nashville.

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Access and Livability: Transit-Oriented Development, The Franklin Corridor Preview

Access and Livability: Transit-Oriented Development, The Franklin Corridor

As Nashville’s economy and population booms, creating new opportunities for transit will help keep our communities healthy and prosperous. Currently, Nashville is a car-centric city leaving most of its people with the automobile as the only option for transportation. As driving costs, obesity rates, and the median age of the population continue to increase, providing transportation options becomes a priority to ensure public health and continued mobility. 

Envision Nolensville Pike: Community, Creativity and Imagination in Placemaking Preview

Envision Nolensville Pike: Community, Creativity and Imagination in Placemaking

Led by Conexión Américas and funded by the Kresge Foundation, ENVISION NOLENSVILLE PIKE maps out --literally and figuratively-- the aspirations and dreams for the Nolensville Pike corridor as expressed by residents and business owners during community gatherings. A public/private partnership with the Nashville Area MPO, Transportation for America and the Nashville Civic Design Center.

Creating a Walkable Green Hills Preview

Creating a Walkable Green Hills

Green Hills is a shopping destination center that was designed around the automobile. The construction of the Mall has spurred commercial development along Hillsboro Pike, in a suburban, strip-mall format with surface parking fronting the corridor. This type of development is not conducive to walking or biking, but instead increases road congestion and discourages a healthy lifestyle. This publication is a result of the work done in partnership with TURBO Nashville and the Alliance for Green Hills.

Nashville's Boathouse: Connecting Community to the Cumberland Preview

Nashville's Boathouse: Connecting Community to the Cumberland

The vision for Nashville’s Riverfront is one that is aimed towards defining and enhancing the unique cultural identity of Music City, USA. As a thriving commercial and industrial district, Nashville’s focus on providing a vibrant waterfront experience for all has recently been bolstered by newly-constructed or renovated landmarks.

Access and Livability: Transit Oriented Development, Nashville’s Northwest Link Preview

Access and Livability: Transit Oriented Development, Nashville’s Northwest Link

This book explores case studies of successful transit-oriented developments from around the United States and offers recommendations for a route along Middle Tennessee’s northwest corridor, a critical route from Nashville to Clarksville. This corridor was originally identified in the Nashville Area Metropolitan Planning Organization’s (MPO) 2035 Regional Transportation Plan (RTP) as a key connection in Middle Tennessee’s mass transit vision. This recommendation was supported by the MPO’s 2008 feasibility study which produced potential alignments for commuter rail, route improvements, capital costs and preliminary operations budget for the corridor between Clarksville and Nashville. Expanding upon that work, in early 2015 the MPO and the Regional Transit Authority (RTA) launched a Northwest Corridor Study to examine cost effective transit improvements in the northwest corridor to connect travelers to destinations (work, school, shopping, entertainment, etc.) and address anticipated traffic congestion.

Access and Livability: Neighborhood Infill Strategies, Developing Davidson County Preview

Access and Livability: Neighborhood Infill Strategies, Developing Davidson County

Metro Nashville is projected to add 200,000 new residents and approximately 300,000 new jobs over the next 25 years. In order to accommodate this influx of growth, Metro must be responsive and proactive in how we design our city and county. While we expect a fair amount of re-development in the urban core as well as greenfield development in the region’s outer reaches, it’s the places in-between that have the most potential. Nashville Next, the general plan for Nashville’s future, calls for city’s pikes and the centers located at their crossroads, to be the areas that will accommodate new residents and workers as we grow. Therefore retrofitting these suburban areas and re- imagining them as mixed-use, vibrant places is imperative to the success of Nashville’s future. These suburban locales offer both a tremendous challenge and a great opportunity for redevelopment in the coming decades.

Access and Livability: Transit Village Planning and Design, Trinity Lane Preview

Access and Livability: Transit Village Planning and Design, Trinity Lane

This publication focuses on the implementation of transit development due to increasing population and urban growth. This development is a result of the growth in the BRT line along Gallatin Pike, and also an outlook on transit-ready development (TRD). The objectives of this publication includes, “communicating the role of transit-oriented development, evaluating successful TRD precedents, charting Nashville’s progress on implementation, and the featuring of existing projects that emphasize goals of compact, mixed-use development.” 

In Search of a New Home for the Nashville Sounds Preview

In Search of a New Home for the Nashville Sounds

The Nashville Sounds are Middle Tennessee’s AAA minor league baseball team. They had been playing at Herschel Greer Stadium (capacity 10,300), which is located in Fort Negley Park, since 1978. The facilities, while having served Nashville well, left much to be desired when compared to other cities’ more modern AAA stadiums. Its location made accessing the stadium difficult for newcomers, and it did little to engage or enhance its built environment.

Neighborhood Update Report Preview

Neighborhood Update Report

This report was produced by the Nashville Civic Design Center staff in cooperation with the Nashville neighborhood groups with which the center has worked in the past. The report was written by Sarah Floyd, staff intern, and edited by Gary Gaston, Design Studio Director, with significant contributions by Anna Shell and Marielle Lovecchio, staff interns. 

Wedgewood Houston Study Preview

Wedgewood Houston Study

This booklet contains detailed information explaining and illustrating these recommendations. The following pages outline issues that were raised during the community meetings, explaining information that was obtained through research by the Civic Design Center, and expands upon the recommendations given to the neighborhood.

Lebanon Preview

Lebanon

The AIA 150 Blueprint for America Assessment and Visioning Workshop for Lebanon.

The Location and Design if a Proposed New Convention Center, Hotel, and Parking in Downtown Nashville Preview

The Location and Design if a Proposed New Convention Center, Hotel, and Parking in Downtown Nashville

On February 17, 2006, the Music City Center Task Force presented to Mayor Bill Purcell and the citizens of Nashville their report entitled The Music City Center for Nashville’s Future (MCC Report) recommending that a new convention center and hotel with parking be constructed downtown on a site in SoBro south of the Gaylord Entertainment Center (GEC). At that time, Mayor Purcell asked the University of Tennessee’s Center for Business and Economic Research to assess the financial assumptions of the MCC Report. He simultaneously requested the Nashville Civic Design Center conduct an assessment of the location and design implications of the proposal, incorporating public meetings for community-wide input. The Mayor’s request to the Civic Design Center paralleled a similar recommendation for input and public meetings in the MCC Report.

Cohousing: A Community Housing Type for Nashville Preview

Cohousing: A Community Housing Type for Nashville

Cohousing residents are consciously committed to living as a wholly integrated community. The physical design of cohousing communities encourages social interaction, while allowing for an appropriate amount of individual space. The private homes throughout the community feature the amenities offered in conventional homes. However, residents have additional access to open green space, courtyards, children’s playgrounds and a common house. Frequently, members of the community share meals in the common house, while also sharing in childcare, gardening and neighborhood governance. By sharing in each of these aspects, a strong sense of community is fostered and created by the residents.

In October of 2015 NCDC members toured the completed cohousing residences.

Lafayette Preview

Lafayette

At the request of the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency (MDHA) the Nashville Civic Design Center conducted a study of the Lafayette - 8th Avenue Area. 

Chestnut Hill Preview

Chestnut Hill

This booklet contains detailed information explaining and illustrating these recommendations. The following pages outline each issue that was raised during the community meetings.

Dickerson Road Inventory Preview

Dickerson Road Inventory

This analysis of development opportunity sites along Dickerson Road is to be used by perspective developers as a supplement to the Metro Planning Department’s work on the East Nashville Community Plan.

Edgehill Neighborhood Preview

Edgehill Neighborhood

At the request of the Organized Neighbors of Edgehill (ONE) the Nashville Civic Design Center conducted a study of the Edgehill Neighborhood. The study area is to the south of The Gulch, north of Wedgwood Ave., west of 8th Avenue South and east of the alley separating Villa Place and 16th Avenue South.

Capitol Boulevard Revisited Preview

Capitol Boulevard Revisited

Since the opening of the downtown Library, there has been renewed interest in the role that Capitol Boulevard, the street directly in front of the Library, plays in the life of the city. The Nashville Civic Design Center, the Library’s neighbor at 7th and Church, has been study ing public space downtown over the past year and placed Capitol Bou le vard at the top of its research agenda be cause of its prominence and potential. The drawings presented here are three, of possibly many, concepts for what Capitol Boulevard can become as we con tin u ous ly try to improve the quality of downtown Nashville.

Rolling Mill Hill & The Rutledge Hill Neighborhood Findings And Recommendations Preview

Rolling Mill Hill & The Rutledge Hill Neighborhood Findings And Recommendations

This document was produced to help guide development of the Metro-owned properties known as Rolling Mill Hill. These holdings include the site of the former Metropolitan Hospital and the area of the historic trolley car barns. The work was produced by the Nashville Civic Design Center in concert with the greater Nashville community. The design staff and interns of the Civic Design Center during the study were: Mark M. Schimmenti, Design Director; John Houghton, Design Assistant; and the design interns Blythe Bailey, Ted Booth, Abbie Lee Majors, and Catherine Tracy. The historical research was conducted by Astrid Schoonhoven. The geological study was by John Houghton. Judy Steele of the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency, Randall Hutcheson of the Metro Planning Department, and Jeff Campbell of Metro Public Works contributed significantly to the report.

Germantown Findings and Recommendations Preview

Germantown Findings and Recommendations

The Nashville Civic Design Center conducted thefollowing design research and analysis to help guide community development immediately north of downtown Nashville, an area bounded by I-265/65, JamesRobertson Parkway, and the Cumberland River. The study area included the neighborhoods of Buena Vista, East Germantown, Germantown, Hope Gardens, and Salemtown.